Posts Categorized: Journal

  • Journal

    Cartography, The Musical

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    I like maps. Even if you’ve never read posts on this site, the name “Mostly Maps” should probably be a giveaway. What you may not know is that I don’t really like musicals. Now granted I’ve seen Rent and Spamalot, but that’s because Alison and I were in New York and the former was recommended by one of my best friends and for the latter I’m a massive Python fan. Maps and musicals aren’t something that go together. But that may be about to change.

  • Journal

    In India Just Because You Can Map Something, Doesn’t Always Mean You Should

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    It’s easy to get stuck in a mental rut, to think that everyone thinks and feels the same way you do about a subject. But sometimes you need to get away and visit another country and another culture to find out that maybe there’s more than one way of looking at a subject. For me that subject is, unsurprisingly, maps and the other country was India.

  • Journal

    The London Underground Strike Map

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    If you’re trying to get out and about in London today you’ve probably noticed that the Tube is on strike. Again. You could read the list of closed stations that are on Transport for London’s website and try and work out quite how, if at all, you’re going to get to where you want to be. Or you could look at a map.

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    A More Accurate And Realistic Map Of The Northern Line

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    Running between Edgware, Mill Hill East and High Barnet to the North of London to Morden to the South, the London Underground’s Northern Line stretches for 36 miles and takes in 50 stations. The line, marked in black on the Tube map, is a familiar sight to London commuters. But is the map of the line accurate? Does it reflect reality?

  • Journal

    All Of Today’s Maps Are Wrong; We Live On A Giant Chicken

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    Up until the 6th. Century BC, it was commonly held that the world we live on was flat. Then Pythagorus came along and started to prove that the world is in fact a sphere. We now know that he was almost right and our planet is really an oblate spheroid, looking not dissimilar to a slightly squashed beach ball.

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    Gazing Into The Geo Crystal Ball For 2014

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    In the closing days of 2013, Atanas Entchev, who together with Glenn Letham are the duo behind the intriguing GeoHipster, got in touch to ask me to do some crystal ball gazing and predict what’s in store for the geo industry in 2014.

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    Farewell Ovi, Nokia And HERE; It’s Time To Open The Next Door

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    This may be a personal foible but when I join a new company I mentally set myself two targets. The first is what I want to achieve with that company. The second is how long it will take to achieve this. If you reach the first target then the second is a moot point. But if the first target doesn’t get reached and your self allocated timescale is close to coming to an end, then it’s time to take stock.

  • Journal

    The Quest For The London Flood Map

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    My morning’s reading today has been dominated by a map image that the UK’s Environment Agency released on December 6th that, to quote the Tweet, shows “the extent of potential flooding of London if the Thames Barrier wasn’t in place“. If you know London at all, it’s certainly an arresting image but like so many times when I encounter a map, I want to interact with it, move it, see whether where I live in London would have been impacted. So I started investigating.

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    The Collective Noun For Geo People Is A GeoMob

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    The Greek Philosopher Heraclitus was fond of saying “the only constant is change” (actually he said “nothing endures but change” but let’s not split hairs). He probably wasn’t talking about meetups and get-togethers in London but this still fits rather well. Events come and go as their themes either go mainstream or fade. But some remain and London’s #geomob is one of those.

  • Journal

    Big Arrows And Beacons; Navigating Across The United States By Plane In The Pre-GPS Era

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    It’s the mid-1920’s and you’re in a plane trying to navigate your way across the vastness of the United States. GPS hasn’t been invented yet. VHF Omni Directional Radio Range, shortened to VOR, hasn’t been invented yet. LFR, or Low Frequency Radio Range, hasn’t been invented yet. How do you hope to stay on course?