Posts Categorized: Journal

  • Journal

    Doctor Who And The Underground Map; Enough Is Enough

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    Oh look. It’s another reworking of Harry Beck’s London Underground map. Ken Field probably won’t like it. This one is Doctor Who related. All the usual suspects are present. Each line representing one of the Doctors? Yes. Stations representing monsters and adversaries? Yes. Vague notions of interchanges between the lines? Oh yes.

  • Journal

    Making Maps The Hard Way – From Memory

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    In his book A Zebra Is The Piano Of The Animal Kingdom, Jarod Kintz wrote “when you’re a cartographer, having to make maps sort of comes with the territory”. He’s right. When your business is making maps you should be able to do just that. But what if you’re not a cartographer? What if you had to draw a map of the country you live in? From memory? What would that map look like?

  • Journal

    King George III Was A Fellow Map Addict

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    The Wikipedia entry for George William Frederick of Hanover, better known as King George III of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, is full of details but misses out one key aspect of his life. In addition to concurrently being King, Duke and prince-elect of Brunswick-L√ľneburg he was also a map addict and avid map collector.

  • Journal

    Push Pins, Dots, Customisation, Brands And Services; The Three Waves Of Making Digital Maps

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    The year 2013 has been a great year for maps and a greater year for maps in the United Kingdom, culminating in events that huddled together under the Maptember banner; OpenStreetMap’s State Of The Map, the AGI’s GeoCommunity and FOSS4G. But there was another event in 2013 that was map related and that was the 50th. anniversary of the British Cartographic Society’s Cartographic Journal.

  • Journal

    Maps For When The Ice Caps Melt and When The Magnetic Poles Reverse

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    About 2 years ago I wrote about something I called mapping the might have been; things that were planned and made it onto a map but which never came about. Now it’s time for the opposite; maps of things that haven’t yet come to be but which probably will. It’s less mapping the might have been and more mapping the will be.

  • Journal

    Introducing The Next Generation Of Portable Navigation Systems

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    Today’s digital maps, both on the web, on our mobile phones and in our cars are almost ubiquitous. But they’re not without their problems. They need recharging, updating and most need some form of network connectivity and that’s even before you look at the potential privacy aspects of who’s watching your position. But now there’s the next generation of portable navigation system.

  • Journal

    If Columbus Or The Vikings Didn’t Discover America, Maybe The Chinese Did? Or Maybe Not

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    Old maps can be valuable. Old maps that show key parts of history, such as “I got here first“, are valuable. Old maps that seem to show that someone else got there first are extremely valuable and can verge on priceless. The prospect of large amounts of money and potential fame can make faking a map that says “you didn’t get there first, someone else did” a very attractive proposition. But if you’re going to fake a map, there’s right ways to do it and there’s wrong ways to do it.

  • Journal

    The Curious Cartographical Case Of The Island Of California

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    We’ve become firmly accustomed to the instant gratification of Internet Time, which can be roughly summarised as “I want it now, dammit“. Nowhere is this more evident than in maps. If something is wrong on a map, we expect it to be fixed. Now. Ten or so years ago, it would be common to wait somewhere between 12 and 18 months for a map’s updates to be collected, validated and published. These days, thanks to our modern digital maps, we get our updates in more or less Internet Time and that means fast. It hasn’t always been that way.

  • Journal

    Men Pointing At Maps? Hell, Yeah. But Where Are The Women?

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    Despite having a lot of NSFW content, estimated at between 2% to 4% by the site’s founder, Tumblr is also the microblogging site that some maps and cartography aficionados call home. The scope and range of these is simply staggering. But now there’s a new, albeit tenuously, related maps Tumblr in town.

  • Journal

    The Tube Map To End All Tube Maps That’s Made Of Tube Maps

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    Despite Transport for London owning the copyright (and enforcing it) on Harry Beck’s iconic map of the London Underground network, people just won’t stop creating variants of the map. I may have written about these once, twice, three or even more times. But now, there’s a reworking of the Tube map to possibly end all Tube maps reworks.