Posts Tagged: cartography

  • Journal

    After The Missing Manual For OpenStreetMap, Here’s The Google Map Maker Version

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    The growth and uptake of today’s internet and web allows us to do a lot of things that were previously the preserve of the professional. You can see this in the rise of words which now have citizen prepended to them. We don’t just write blog posts, we’re citizen journalists. We don’t just take photographs,… Read more »

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    2013 – The Year Of The Tangible Map And Return Of The Map As Art

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    Looking back at the conference talks I gave and the posts I wrote in 2012, two themes are evident. The first theme is that while there’s some utterly gorgeous digital maps being produced these days, such as Stamen’s Watercolor, the vast majority of digital maps can’t really be classified as art. Despite the ability to… Read more »

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    Making PostgreSQL, PostGIS And A Mac Play Nicely Together

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    Most things in life are a journey and the destination of this particular journey was to try and create a custom map style that represented the unique features and challenges of Tandale. Which meant I needed to download and install TileMill, an interactive map design tool. Which meant I needed to learn Carto, the CSS-like… Read more »

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    Maps, Maps And MOAR Maps At The Society Of Cartographers And Expedia

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    Updated September 13th. 2012 with embedded YouTube video. Wednesday September 5th. 2012 was a day of maps. To be precise, it was a day of maps, maps and MOAR maps. Two events, two talks, back to back. Packed choc-a-bloc full of maps. I also cheated slightly. Firstly there was the International Cartographical Association’s first session… Read more »

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    The Missing Manual For OpenStreetMap?

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    The first computer I used at work was powerful for its day (though pitifully underpowered compared to the phone that’s sitting in my pocket at the moment) but was somewhat unfriendly by today’s standards. You sat down at a terminal (not a PC, they hadn’t been invented) and were presented with a command line prompt… Read more »

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    After Neogeography, Here Comes Neocartography

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    First there was neogeography, a convenient label for the practice of geography outside of the formally accepted geographical disciplines. A convenient label, but one which caused some controversy and mud slinging with the aforementioned formally accepted disciplines being labelled paleogeography and with a strong emphasis on the pejorative. So it seems almost inevitable that we… Read more »

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    Putting The Tube On The Grid; A Geeked Out Cartographical Recipe

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    Here’s a simple, cut-out-and-keep recipe for making a very geeked out update on a cartographical classic. First, take a classic and iconic map which appeals to both the map geek in you as well as the Tube geek in you. Harry Beck’s 1931 reworking of the map of the London Underground system will do nicely…. Read more »

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    Just Because You Can Put Something On A Map …

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    A quick review through last year’s posts shows a fairly consistent theme of mine; that despite the absence of the map in many of today’s location services sometimes the map is the best way of simply presenting information in a readily accessible and understandable form. But a map is much more than just a visualisation… Read more »

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    Remapping The World By Population Size

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    From the department of cartographical curiosities comes this wonder; a map of the world but with the countries changed so that their population size corresponds to the size of each country. It’s a map of the world; but not as we know it and has cropped up in several places online, including Frank Jacob’s excellent… Read more »

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    The Plains Of Awkward Public Family Interactions And The Bay Of Flames

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    Not content with pointing out the fun you can have with tracking your location, xkcd, the webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math and language has branched out into making maps. The updated map of online communities shows the volume of daily social activity across all of the online world, and not just the high profile ones… Read more »