Posts Tagged: geotagged

  • Journal

    How Did 2014’s Geo Predictions Actually Work Out?

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    In January of 2014, Atanas Entchev from GeoHipster asked me to make some predictions about where the maps, location and geo industry would go during the course of the year. That year has now passed, so I think it’s time to revisit those predictions and see how inaccurate my crystal ball gazing really was. Raster… Read more »

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    Forget Neo-geographers, We’re Now Geo-hipsters

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    I don’t grow my own organic vertices. Nor do I use gluten-free technology. At least not that I’m aware. But I have been known to geocode by hand, in small batches and I do follow the @geohipster Twitter account. According to a new map put together by Ralph Straumann, that’s enough to make me a #geohipster.

  • Journal

    Of Geocoders, Open Cages, Mapping APIs and Going It Alone

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    It’s been a while since I’ve written one of these posts, in fact it’s been almost a year. A lot has happened since December of 2013, when I wrote “Who knows precisely where 2014 will take me?“. To be more precise, this is where 2014 took me …

  • Journal

    Welcome to B2* … The New Reality Of The Mapping Industry

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    Not all Geographic Information conferences are created equal. A great proof point for this is IRLOGI, the Irish Association for Geographic Information. Today I’ve been in Dublin at their annual GIS Ireland 2014 conference, which is in its 19th year. I’d been invited to give one of the opening keynotes; who could resist such an invitation?

  • Journal

    The Challenge Of Open

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    One of the great things about the combination of maps, geo, location and London is that roughly once a month there’s some kind of meetup happening in the city on these themes. One of the longer running players in this space is the Geospatial Specialist Group of the British Computer Society which is being relaunched and reinvigorated as the Location Information SG. Earlier this week I gave a talk, but what to talk about?

  • Journal

    Welcome To The Republic Of Null Island

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    In English, null means nothing, nil, empty or void. In computing, null is a special value for nothing, an empty value. In geography, null tends to be what you get when you’ve been unable to geocode a place or an address and haven’t checked the geocoder’s response. What you end up with is a pair of coordinates of 0 degrees longitude and 0 degrees latitude, a point somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, south of Ghana and west of Gabon. It’s here that you’ll also find Null Island, if you look hard enough.

  • Journal

    Cartography, The Musical

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    I like maps. Even if you’ve never read posts on this site, the name “Mostly Maps” should probably be a giveaway. What you may not know is that I don’t really like musicals. Now granted I’ve seen Rent and Spamalot, but that’s because Alison and I were in New York and the former was recommended by one of my best friends and for the latter I’m a massive Python fan. Maps and musicals aren’t something that go together. But that may be about to change.

  • Journal

    In India Just Because You Can Map Something, Doesn’t Always Mean You Should

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    It’s easy to get stuck in a mental rut, to think that everyone thinks and feels the same way you do about a subject. But sometimes you need to get away and visit another country and another culture to find out that maybe there’s more than one way of looking at a subject. For me that subject is, unsurprisingly, maps and the other country was India.

  • Journal

    The London Underground Strike Map

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    If you’re trying to get out and about in London today you’ve probably noticed that the Tube is on strike. Again. You could read the list of closed stations that are on Transport for London’s website and try and work out quite how, if at all, you’re going to get to where you want to be. Or you could look at a map.

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    A More Accurate And Realistic Map Of The Northern Line

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    Running between Edgware, Mill Hill East and High Barnet to the North of London to Morden to the South, the London Underground’s Northern Line stretches for 36 miles and takes in 50 stations. The line, marked in black on the Tube map, is a familiar sight to London commuters. But is the map of the line accurate? Does it reflect reality?