Posts Tagged: teddington

  • Journal

    Not Your Average User Contributed Map

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    Today I contributed to a map. I did this yesterday as well. I even did this last week. In fact I’ve been doing this since the end of July 2009. As of right now I’ve done this 11,880 times. I’ll probably end up contributing to this map again later on today and will almost definitely… Read more »

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    2013 – The Year Of The Tangible Map And Return Of The Map As Art

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    Looking back at the conference talks I gave and the posts I wrote in 2012, two themes are evident. The first theme is that while there’s some utterly gorgeous digital maps being produced these days, such as Stamen’s Watercolor, the vast majority of digital maps can’t really be classified as art. Despite the ability to… Read more »

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    Making PostgreSQL, PostGIS And A Mac Play Nicely Together

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    Most things in life are a journey and the destination of this particular journey was to try and create a custom map style that represented the unique features and challenges of Tandale. Which meant I needed to download and install TileMill, an interactive map design tool. Which meant I needed to learn Carto, the CSS-like… Read more »

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    A Year On And Yahoo’s Maps API Finally Shuts Down

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    Nothing on the interwebs is forever. Services start up and either become successful, get acquired or shut down. If they shut down they usually end up in TechCrunch’s deadpool. The same applies for APIs and when they finally go offline, they usually end up in the Programmable Web deadpool. At around 1.30 PM London time… Read more »

  • Journal

    When Geolocation Doesn’t Locate

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    Geolocation in today’s smartphones is a wonderful thing. The A-GPS chip in your phone talks to the satellites whizzing around above our heads and asks them where we are. If that doesn’t work then a graceful degrading process, via public wifi triangulation and then cell tower triangulation will tell our phones where we are. Except… Read more »

  • Journal

    The “Maps As Art” Debate

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    Ah … art. Art is a contentious area for discussion. One person’s work of art is another person’s random spots of paint on a canvas. As Rudyard Kipling once put it, “it’s clever, but is it art?“. Even artists can’t seem to agree on this topic. Compare and contrast Picasso’s comment that “everything you can… Read more »

  • Journal

    The London Tube Map Made (Too) Simple

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    This is post number six in the ongoing #mapgasm series of posts on maps found on the interwebs that I like. Yes, it’s another map. Yes, it’s another Tube map. I make no apologies for this. A simple map is often a good map. Cutting away cartographical clutter can reveal the heart of what a… Read more »

  • Journal

    Map Nature Or Map Nurture; Are Map Addicts Born Or Made?

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    I’ve said it before, many times, but I’m a 100% un-reconstructed map addict and make no apology for it. I’ve said this in posts I’ve written on this blog as well as using it as part of my introduction for talks at conferences. This post is a slightly more long winded version of why I… Read more »

  • Journal

    Work+ – A Fantastic Idea For A Location Based App; Shame About The Metadata Though

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    I once wrote two posts saying that people are mistaking the context (location) for the end game and that location is (also) a key context, but most people don’t know this. Two years or so after I wrote those posts, the concept of location based mobile services and location based apps shows no sign of… Read more »

  • Journal

    What Do You Call The Opposite Of Mapping?

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    Dutch computer scientist Edsger Dijkstra, who was awarded the Turing Prize in 1972 is reported to have once said … If debugging is the process of removing bugs, then programming must be the process of putting them in. With this in mind, if the process of taking geographical information and making this into a map… Read more »