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It rained last night in London. This is not news. This is not even an uncommon occurence. Granted, it was heavy rainfall, as evidenced by the windows of the restaurant in Soho last night being drenched every time a car went up Wardour Street and by the tree branch which was floating off down the road outside my house.

None of this explains why our public transport infrastructure seems to come to a sudden shuddering stop everytime the weather (rain, snow, autumn leaves, frost, ice) for which this country is reknown, actually happens. I’m sure the Victorians didn’t have this sort of problem when they built the railways and I’m sure they had pumps to get rid of the rain when it collected, inconveniently, in tunnels too.
 

Posted via email from Gary’s Posterous

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Gary

A self-professed map addict, Gary has worked in the mapping and location space for over 20 years through a combination of luck and occasional good judgement. Gary is co-founder of Malstow Geospatial, which provides handmade, professional geospatial consulting. A Fellow of the RGS, he tweets about maps, writes about them and even makes them.


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Ed Parsons said ...

Fulwell Tunnel, it's more like a big bridge !!

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Gary said ...

All of no miles and 72 whole yards according to Phil Deaves (http://deaves47.users.btopenworld.com/Tunnels/Tunnels1.htm). More small pipe than tunnel.

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